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    Find the Home Loan That Fits Your Needs | Christy Buck Team

    It’s easier to settle into your new home if you’re confident you can afford it.

    Here are the things you need to know about your mortgage financing options, including how to choose the loan that matches your income and tolerance for risk.

    Mortgage Financing Basics

    The most important features of your mortgage loan are:

    1. Term (how long your loan will last)

    Mortgages usually come in 15-, 20-, 30- or 40- year lengths. The longer your term is the lower your monthly payment. The interest rate on a 15-year mortgage might be 1% lower than the rate on a 30-year mortgage.

    The trade-off for a lower payment on the 30-year mortgage is that you are making more payments. Because you borrow the money for longer, you pay more interest to the lender.

    2. Interest Rate (how much you pay to borrow the money)

    Mortgage interest rates are typically fixed and adjustable.

    A fixed rate gives you the same interest rate and payment until the end of your mortgage. Thats perfect when you’re risk averse , if your future income won’t rise or when interest rates are low.

    The interest rate you pay on an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) changes at some point in the future based on where interest rates are at that time. ARMs are named for how long the rates last. For example, with a 5/1 ARM, your rate changes after the first five years and again every year after that.

    ARM Risks and Rewards

    An adjustable-rate mortgage rate goes up or down based on a particular financial market index, such as treasury bills. Typically, ARMs include a limit on how much the interest rate can change, such as 3% each time the rate changes, or 5% over the life of the loan.

    Rewards for the uncertainty:

    • ARMs can be a good choice if you expect your income to grow significantly in the coming years.
    • The interest rate may drop if the financial market index that it tracks dips.
    • An ARM usually starts at a lower rate than a fixed-rate mortgage of the same length and that can mean big savings.

    Risks: If rates go up, your ARM payment will jump dramatically. So before you choose an ARM, be comfortable with your answers to these questions:

    • How much can my monthly payments go up at each adjustment?
    • How soon and how often can my monthly payment go up?
    • Can I afford the maximum monthly payment?
    • Do I expect my income to increase or decrease by the time the mortgage payment adjusts?
    • Do I plan to own the home for longer than the initial low-interest-rate period, or do I plan to sell before the rate adjusts?
    • Will I have to pay a penalty if I refinance into a lower-rate mortgage or sell my house?
    • What’s my goal in buying this property? Am I considering a riskier mortgage to buy a more expensive house than I can realistically afford?

    More Mortgage Options: Government-Backed Loans

    If you’ve saved less than the ideal downpayment of 20%, or your credit score isn’t high enough for you to qualify for a fixed-rate or ARM with a conventional lender, consider a government-backed loan from FHA or the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Before you decide on any mortgage, remember that slight variations in interest rates, loan amounts, and terms can significantly affect your monthly payment.

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